Tag Archives: State Game Land 57

Bartlett Mountain Balds, White Brook Falls, and Bowman Hollow Falls

On an unusually warm December Sunday, I got to hike to State Game Land 57’s Bartlett Mountain Balds with none other than Jeff Mitchell himself. Author of Hiking the Endless Mountains and intrepid explorer of one of eastern PA’s most remote areas, Jeff has probably crawled up most streams and seen more of the vast SGL57 than anyone else on the planet.

I had wanted to see the balds since I had first read about them on Jeff’s website. I had previously hiked to the very fine vista on nearby Flat Top Mountain but the balds seemed set apart from that even. Lying in one of the most remote parts of the forest, the top of Bartlett Mountain features large rock balds, featuring beautiful spruce forests and amazing solitude.

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The Windy Valley

I left my house before 7 to take the 3+ hour drive to Wyoming County. I met Jeff in the small parking lot just past White Brook in the area known as the Windy Valley. The Mehoopany Creek flowed quietly nearby. Despite being mid-December, the temperature was due to reach close to 70 degrees on the day.

Jeff arrived a little after 10 a.m. and we were soon on our way up an unblazed grade. I had started our hike in long sleeves, but the way to the balds was all uphill and I was soon stripping down to short sleeves. Jeff joked if that if they were to ever named a trail for him, the grade up to the balds would be appropriate as he’d been that way many times.

We walked uphill for about 2 miles before the trail leveled off. The top of the mountain was wet and we had to skirt puddles as we continued along the trail. We arrived at the edge of the balds as a walls of rock appeared in the forest. There were large rock overhangs and even crevices and caves. We made sure to make plenty of noise to alert any bears in the area.

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Overhangs near the edge of the balds

We found a crevice in the rock that had tree roots growing out of it. It made for the easiest climb up to the balds. We made our way up and climbed to the balds, where the flat, white rock stretched out in front of us. The balds were dotted with Spruce trees and the solitude was striking.

We walked into the balds a little ways and sat down to have a quick lunch. The quiet was outstanding. It seemed a million miles from noisy Philadelphia apartment.

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Hiking the balds
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Cliffs
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Spruce tree

We walked up the north rim of the balds where smaller balds were fully enclosed in Spruce forests. The solitude continued to be impressive. I made plenty of noise to alert any bears that might be out. We even saw a bear print on the ground.

Jeff had hoped to show me the way to the “Spruce Ridge” but we were running low on time, being one of the shortest days of the year. We headed off the balds and back down the trail that brought us up the mountain to begin with. About halfway down the trail, we turned on a side trail that descended more steeply to White Brook.

White Brook
White Brook

The stream was beautiful and we arrived at it near a small cascade. The water was remarkably clear and the setting was superb. We made our way down the stream, navigating slippery rocks, tricky ledges, and lots of blowdowns. After about a mile of hiking, we reached White Brook Falls, an impressive 15-20 foot falls.

White Brook Falls
White Brook Falls

We climbed out of the gorge and back to the trail where we started. We flushed a ring necked grouse from the trail, but it disappeared impressively in the underbrush before either of us could grab a picture. We arrived back in at the parking area in the Windy Valley as the sun started to set.

Jeff had one last stop for us and we drove up the road out of the game lands into the small town of Forkston. We headed uphill and parked at a small pull-off above Bowman Hollow. The stream, and it’s waterfall, are technically on private property but it seems accessible to the public and no signs were posted.

We hiked down to the stream, which had beautiful slides and cascades. A short ways upstream, we reached the impressive Bowman Hollow Falls, an almost 50 foot falls that canons over white rocks. Despite not having a tripod, I managed a few decent shots of the falls.

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Bowman Hollow
Bowman Hollow Falls
Bowman Hollow Falls

We parted way and I drove back to Philadelphia in awe of having seen another beautiful place in the Endless Mountains.

Full gallery of images:

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Flat Top Vista

We actually set out to return to State Game Land 13 in Sullivan County, but changed course when we hit Route 80 and saw the pockets of color still left in some of the trees. Wanting to find a good view, we decided to head to a part of State Game Land 57 that we had not yet explored but wanted to for some time.

A slight mistake in navigation had us approaching the trail head along SR 3001/Windy Valley Rd from the west – something I do not recommend unless you have a car with 4 wheel drive. The road descends down to the Mehoopany Creek on an unpaved path through the heart of SGL57. It is very beautiful, but the road is quite precipitous. It is much easier to access this area from Rt 87 in Forkston.

We parked in the game commission lot just south of White Creek. The leaves that did have color stood out brightly amongst the greys and browns of the trees that had already lost their leaves.

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Beautiful late autumn foliage

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The trail meanders past a handful of cottages along White Creek following the boundary of the game lands. We headed steadily uphill for close to 3/4 of a mile. Many of the leaves were already down, but there were still some pockets of bright yellow, particularly at the lower elevations. The trails here are not blazed, but are fairly obvious as they move up the mountain.

We reached the point where the trail heading west continues on when a trail comes in from the left. A street sign (with plenty of bullet holes in it) that says “Watch for Stopped Vehicles” marks the turn. Seasonal views to the south and east appeared through the trees as we continued a steady climb to the top of Bartlett Mountain.shotgunsign

The unmarked trail switchbacks a few times before reaching a steeper section that juts up among bigger rocks. We reached the top of the mountain, where we cut through some low brush to a stunning view over the gorge of the Mehoopany.

With the exception of a small cottage at the foot of the mountain, the view is completely untouched. My photos don’t do the view justice, as I was shooting almost directly into the setting sun. The pockets of color stood out amongst the bare trees as the sun set over the valley. The cold wind rustling the trees was the only sound as we took in the view, reveling in the solitude of the setting.

Flat Top Vista-2

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We enjoyed the view for a few minutes before starting our descent back down the mountain. We were treated to more limited views as we descended steeply. The freshly fallen leaves covered slippery rocks and hidden crevices and both my hiking partner and I almost lost our footing a number of times.

Hiking on the leaves was quite the cacophony with two people and a 70 lbs dog, so I did not expect to see much wildlife. But we did see a turkey on the ascent and a white tailed deer on the way back down. I’ve read of bears and rattlesnakes both being active in this area.

We descended back down to the Stopped Vehicle sign and then even more steeply down the main trail as we returned to the car.

With limited light left, we drove quickly to the new bridge over the Mehoopany. The creek was ravaged by flooding during Hurricane Irene in 2011 and a large floodplain is still evident. Many large boulders line the creek.

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Mehoopany Creek

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I look forward to coming back to explore more of this area. It is a vast, wild space. The Mehoopany runs untouched for miles through the game lands and looks to have many rapids and cascades. There are reportedly more views to see on the top of Bartlett Mountain